California Fools Californians Into Higher Taxes Again


With the help of the mainstream media and its rags, the California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS) is yet again using its over $233 in reported investment fund wealth to somehow claim it is in a deficit, despite having an investment return this fiscal year.

(Note here that the actual gross fund balances are generally many billions higher, and were reported as $245,848,527,000 in 2011, and $204,727,543,000 in the 2010 CAFR’s.)

USA Today put out the following story, which was of course originally printed from the false-news clearing house, Associated Press:

“SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The nation’s largest public pension fund collected a dismal 1% annual return on its investments, a figure far short of projections that will likely bring pressure on California’s state and local governments to contribute more money, officials said Monday.

The return reported by the California Public Employees’ Retirement System was well below its projected return of 7.5% for the fiscal year that ended June 30.

The investment returns are critical because taxpayers are on the hook for the difference if the pension funds fail to meet their performance targets.

“The last 12 months were a challenging period for all investors as the ongoing European debt crisis and slowing global economic growth increased market volatility and reduced equity returns,” said chief investment officer Joe Dear. “It’s a clear reminder that we must remain focused on performance, risk and internal controls in today’s financial environment.”

The fund was most impacted by a negative -7% return on global equities. Half the pension’s assets are in equities, Dear said.

The fund, known as CalPERS, runs a $234 billion pension system for more than 1.6 million state employees, school employees and local government workers…”

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In this first three paragraphs we can see the entire scam played out in front of us, as told from a master story-teller who is trying to sell sunglasses to a blind man. But even a blind man should be able to read between the lines here…

So far, we have learned that the CalPERS Pension fund has earned a 1% increase in its investment portfolio, which for this year would have been over $2.2 billion dollar in gains on investments. Yes, that’s $2,200,000,000 when spelled out properly. And this is of course reported as bad news!

Why?

Simply because CalPERS did not reach its “projected” goal. It wished upon a star, and failed to reach that star. It did not lose value or money, it only failed to miss its desired gains. It still did fine, and has no problems whatsoever meeting its “obligations” to pensioners. In fact, if CalPERS liquidated all of its investments today at today’s market value it could easily pay future pension benefits for the next 15-20 years.

So what’s the problem?

That’s just it, there is no real or tangible problem. You see, governments across the country are crying broke or bankruptcy based on this type of situation – hiding assets with future liabilities, without reporting the future assets that will pay for those liabilities. With billions in assets, all of this hoopla is based on nothing more than throwing a temper tantrum because the CalPERS fund didn’t reach what it wanted to reach this year.

It’s true. Nothing bad has actually happened here, as we will see in a moment. But the government creates any excuse it can in order to collect higher taxes,  or to funnel as much taxpayer money into the pension system. Case in point: here the article states that “California State and local governments (will be forced to) contribute more money“. In other words, the government wishes to keep its investment wealth untouched instead of liquidating it to pay for pension obligations to its employees. And so it will raise taxes instead, as the article states here: “taxpayers are on the hook for the difference if the pension funds fail to meet their performance targets.” Remember, taxes fund government. So government contributions means taxpayer contributions, despite the fact that taxpayers receive absolutely no benefits from the pension system, only employees of the government receive pension benefits.

Now imagine if Target, Bank of America, General Electric, or any other corporation out there forced all people in America or in an individual State or local government to pay for its private employee’s pension fund costs. How would that make you feel? Well, that is how the pension fund system works, as this article tells you.

Note here as well that the so-called “loss” on the equity value of stock and investments does not represent a loss of the actual number of stocks or investments. Just because a stock goes down in value for a 1 year period, does not mean that it will stay down. The same amount of stock is still held, and that physical equity has not changed, only this years value.

For instance, the following capital gains for 2010 and 2011 fiscal years were stated by the CalPERS pension fund in its Comprehensive Annual Financial Report:

CalPERS (2011) – $41.1 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

CalPERS reports 20.7% investment return for fiscal year

“The California Public Employees Retirement System (CalPERS) reported a 20.7 percent return on investments in preliminary estimates for the one-year period that ended June 30, 2011.

This is our best annual performance in 14 years, said Rob Feckner, CalPERS Board President. For the second straight fiscal year, the Pension Fund exceeded its long-term annualized earnings target of 7.75 percent.”

(Source –> http://www.opalesque.com/IndustryUpdates/1880/CalPERS_reports_investment_return_for_fiscal_year188.html)

CalPERS (2010) – 13.3 % increase with a $23.2 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

“The California Public Employees’ Retirement System, the largest U.S. public pension, earned a 12.5 percent return in 2010, led by gains in private equity and U.S. stocks, Chief Investment Officer John Dear said.

The $228 billion pension fund earned 17.3 percent from domestic equity and 21.5 percent in alternative investments such as private equity, Dear said today. Its real-estate portfolio lost 5 percent while its fixed-income investments gained 12 percent“.”

(Source –>http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-01-20/calpers-earned-12-5-return-in-2010-chief-investment-officer-dear-says.html)

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Also, in 2009 fiscal year, as with all fiscal years, the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report show the following contributions from employees and separately from taxpayers (government).

Employees: $4,154,388,000

Taxpayers: $7,605,532,000

And here is a USA Today article with the headline:

Calpers posts 16.7% gain for fiscal year

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) — Calpers, the biggest U.S. pension fund, earned a 16.7% return on its investments in its fiscal year ended June 30, (2004) best returns in six years, the fund said Tuesday.

(Source –>http://www.usatoday.com/money/markets/us/2004-08-10-calpers-portfolio_x.htm)

And in 1998, CalPERS reported a record 19.5% gain in its investment portfolio. Yipee!

So the question you might be asking yourself is… Why don’t the taxpayers get a refund of all of that money they are putting into the pension system when there is a good year, when we have to be “on the hook” to support the fund with more taxpayer money in a bad year?  Not that this was really a bad year, mind you.

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Notice here that I am not mentioning 2008 in this list, and instead giving the reader the impression that CalPERS has gained every year in its portfolio. That is what the news does, you see, but not me. In 2008, Calpers lost a butt-load of asset value to the tune of $58.8 billion due to the financial crash of that time. This was big news of course.

The point here is that a portfolio such as this is designed to acquire as many assets as possible, knowing in advance that those assets will go up and down in the short term, but is designed for the long term. A slow year or a loss is expected every once in a while, of course, and events happen and the economy goes bad and the strengthens again. This is an established reality that any long term investor will tell you.

So let’s here what CalPERS itself says about this years portfolio:

Press Release
July 16, 2012
External Affairs Branch

CalPERS Reports Preliminary 2011-12 Fiscal Year Performance of 1 Percent

Real estate portfolio earns nearly 16 percent exceeding benchmark

SACRAMENTO, CA – The California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) today reported a 1 percent return on investments for the 12 months that ended June 30, 2012, falling short of its benchmark that returned 1.7 percent. CalPERS assets at the end of the fiscal year stood at more than $233 billion.

The small gain – despite continued volatility in world markets and economies – was helped by improved performance of CalPERS real estate investments. Investments in income-generating properties like office, industrial and retail assets returned approximately 15.9 percent, outperforming the pension fund’s real estate benchmark by more than 3 percent.

CalPERS performance was negatively impacted by significant allocations to U.S. and international public equities.

“The last twelve months were a challenging period for all investors as the ongoing European debt crisis and slowing global economic growth increased market volatility and reduced equity returns,” said Joe Dear, CalPERS Chief Investment Officer. “It’s a clear reminder that we must remain focused on performance, risk and internal controls in today’s financial environment.”

CalPERS 1 percent return is below the fund’s discount rate of 7.5 percent, a long-term hurdle lowered recently in response to a steady decline in inflation and as part of CalPERS routine evaluation of economic assumptions. CalPERS 20-year investment return is 7.7 percent.

It’s important to remember that CalPERS is a long-term investor and one year of performance should not be interpreted as a signal about our ability to achieve our investment goals over the long-term,” said Henry Jones, Chair of CalPERS Investment Committee…

Returns for real estate, private equity and some components of the inflation assets reflect market values through March 31, 2012 (not June 30, 2012). Final performance including the last quarter of the fiscal year will be available after asset valuations are completed.

Investment returns are based on compounded daily earnings over the year, including continuing member contributions and benefit payments, and do not precisely correspond to one-year changes in CalPERS overall portfolio market value.

(Source –> http://www.calpers.ca.gov/index.jsp?bc=/about/press/pr-2012/july/preliminary-returns.xml

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In another listed report, the CalPERS system shows that “CalPERS Outperformed Its 7.5 Percent Target 13 out of the Last 20 Fiscal Years (FY 1992/93 – FY 2011/12).

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So what does this all mean?

Remember, this reported bad thing of an over $2 billion gain in net assets for the fiscal year is being reported after all benefits have been paid out to the employees of this pension fund. And so there is no loss at all for the year, and this gain is all profit for the fund.

Also notice that for the last 20 years, this fund has attained an above average return on investments, 7.7% compared to the desired 7.5%. This is the wonderful aspect of the CAFR – it allows you to see previous cycles so as to not be fooled by media sound bites. Here, CalPER’s confirms the data in the financial statements that prove that this fund is wealthy beyond even the stated CalPER’s long term goals.

Simply put, this whole media frenzy was a false flag scare tactic – utilizing incomplete information for the CalPERS fiscal year report as stated by CalPERS to pre-program the people of California to accept unnecessary and unneeded increases in taxation, and all for a pension fund that will benefit the taxpayers in no way whatsoever.

We will not know the true statement of CalPERS financial situation until the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) is released for fiscal year 2011-2012, sometime in the next couple of months.

The problem is, most taxpayers have never heard of the CAFR, and place blind trust in their government and their media when they report such ridiculously contradiction data-sets as we have seen here from the Associated Press. And as government forces taxpayers to contribute taxpayer money into the public pension systems of the Federal, State, County, municipality, and district funds on an involuntary basis every year, the taxpayer base looses over $900 billion into the either of public pension black hole each year. This is to say nothing of what the employees of government are also forced to contribute.

If Walmart or Haliburton corporations required taxpayers to fund their pensions at no benefit to the taxpayers in any way, there would be riots in the street tomorrow.

And if they tried to get away with trying to convince the people (or for that matter the IRS) that their over $2 billion dollar gain in investments was somehow a bad thing or was somehow a loss requiring more taxpayer infusions into the Walmart or Haliburton corporate structure, there would be attorneys, accountants, CEO’s, and Board members hanging from the nearest tree…

What gives America?

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–Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)
–Saturday, July 21, 2012

CAFR SCHOOL: How Corporations Are Funded By Taxpayers


As a lowly young man full of ideas that would have changed the world; and naively believing that I could implement them, I often wondered at how large corporations became so wealthy and attained such incredible amounts of capital for their projects, warehouses, office buildings, investments, and for their global expansion. Why were the tallest buildings in every city I visited always topped with a bank logo? Why were the names of every city’s sports arenas and concert halls being replaced with oil/energy and other corporation names and logos, even though the taxpayers paid for their construction? And after many failed attempts to start up my own small business ventures that would revolutionize the world, I gave up trying to play in the big boy markets, because I couldn’t get my hands on the big boy money. I realized that some unseen hand would not allow me to compete, though I could never figure out just whose hand it was. And so I gave up… justifying and rationalizing my failures on this unseen force that I knew existed but could never actually see…

And then I met a man named Walter Burien.

It is not often in our lives that we come across one man who virtually lifts the wool from over our own eyes, but this was one of those times. It was not so much what he showed me as much as what he inspired me to do. And thanks to him, I was hooked on a little thing called the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR).

For months and months I poured over these financial statements for the various types of government municipal corporations, attempting to comprehend the almost foreign creative accounting language and legalese that was presented within – which was sure to drive off even the most ardent of researchers. But for some reason, as frustrating as that learning curve was, I persisted. And finally, after so many years of being blinded by that unseen hand, I can at last see my nemesis…

As it turns out, this foe was the very government structure that had passed the legislation limiting me in my business ventures. It is the same government corporate structure that assigns patents to the major corporations, while making the patenting process either too expensive or too difficult for the average person or small business to utilize. It was the same government corporation that made it so hard to incorporate in the first place, and which created so many fees, taxes, and restrictions that a small business could never really get ahead. And it is the same government that literally owns everything you can see – that has invested over many decades into all private and public corporations, real estate, foreign currencies, precious metals, and everything else worth owning under the sun and around the world.

No wonder the average Joe can’t get ahead!

I have been asked several times to explain how banks, weapons manufacturers, insurance companies, investment holdings companies, health and pharmaceutical corporations, and essentially the entire corporate business structure of the world is funded - why do private corporations have so much extra money to expand, to buy other corporations, and to just in general play around with? How do banks come up with the capital to mortgage the entirety of the salable lands of the world? And where does that money come from in the first place?

As it turns out, the people of the United States are paying for this through their own sheer ignorance of where their own taxpayer money is being taken and invested. And this of all ironies is the most destructive reality for the very people who lack the knowledge of their own governments’ grand conspiracy through its investment fund scheme.

And today, I’m here to wake you the hell up!

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The Problem With Pensioners

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As a public pensioner, what would you do if I told you that, indirectly, you are responsible for most of the problems in the world, from hunger to depression to war?

What would you do if I told you that each one of you as pensioners are voluntarily invested in all of the corporations that are destroying our health, our prosperity, and our world?

What would you do if you found out that because of each one of you collectively, the worst of corporations are being funded with taxpayer money?

How would you feel if you were heavily responsible for the funding of globalization; for building up Mexico and China’s sweatshops and promoting imports to America – and for the loss of jobs in America – simply because you are not paying attention – or don’t know – or don’t care – about what your “retirement nest-egg” is investing in, as long as you’re taken care of in the end?

What would you do if you found out that your pension contributions went to fund the corporate stocks and bonds that are used to build the weapons, the chemical biological agents, and the depleted uranium armaments that are killing and retarding millions upon millions of men, women, and children around the globe, including in America?

What if you finally comprehended that the national and international banks, oil and pharmaceutical companies are all funded by your “contributions”, and that all of the taxpayer’s in America are also forced through taxation to contribute to your pension fund investment scheme (with no benefit to the taxpayers themselves), knowing that the U.S. occupations of the Arab nations like Afghanistan and Iraq are for the government’s and the corporation’s control of oil and opium, and that these beautiful countries and their infrastructures are decimated just so that corporations like Halliburton can rebuild those infrastructures via no-bid government contracts while being forced into debt by the very government you fund?

How would it feel to know that the entirety of the government-contracted corporations that make up the “Military-Industrial Complex” are all funded by our collective pension fund contributions?

What would you do?

Is your nest-egg; your pension retirement benefits… are they really more valuable than the millions and millions of lives lost around the world at the hands of the corporations that your collective monetary contributions support via these government investment pension pools?

If you are a taxpayer or a pensioner (and that’s about anyone who is reading this), then you are absolutely and collectively 100% responsible for all of the above – simply because you don’t know.

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Where Are My Pension Contributions Invested?

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This oh so important question is one that is not generally asked by the recipients of pension benefits. To most, the answer to this question does not matter, as long as there is a return on that investment today that will guarantee personal retirement benefits tomorrow. And this is perhaps the most egregious and shameful aspect of the entire population of America – of all people. For your wealth and the benefits that you receive are directly correlated to the poverty and destruction that allows corporations and government to prosper. In short, as a pensioner, you are being paid for looking the other way.

As a taxpayer, you should know that many 100′s of billions of dollars are ripped out of the tax-base each year and force fed into the nation-wide pension system (including Social Security) in the form of “on-behalf” taxpayer “contributions” for federal, state, local, and district pension employees. This world-wide phenomenon has created an international pension investment system that, in January 2008, Morgan Stanley estimated held over US $20 trillion in assets, and are collectively the largest investment platform in the world. Others with a less personal and unbiased interest in these pension funds make this estimate to be many trillions higher.

We have all heard about Morgan Stanley, as well as many other major conglomerate banking institutions like J P Morgan Chase. They have been demonized as rogue institutions that are destroying the economy seemingly outside of the law or of government intervention – aside from bailing them out with taxpayer money when their gambling habits take a wrong turn (publicly and purposefully that is, because for every loss there is an equal gain by some other entity collaboratively playing the same game).

So let’s examine some of the United States’ Pension investments that are funding the capital liquidity and crime of institutions like Morgan Stanley…

We’ll use the largest public pension fund in the United States, CalPERS.

For those who have never before had the chance to behold the incredibly inconceivable wealth and investments that most pension funds have within, this is a wonderful tool to get a grasp on just how the international structure of corporations that make up the “economy” get their funding. Here is the “Annual Investment Report” for fiscal year 2011, which shows all of CalPERS individual investments:

Link–> http://www.calpers.ca.gov/eip-docs/about/pubs/annual-investment-report-2011.pdf

One could spend all day going through this investment holdings report and find just about every corporation in the world as a government investment stock-held company. But remember, this is just one of thousands of pension funds across the country, all with the same investment structure on different levels.

So let’s look and see just how much of your taxpayer and pension contributions in just CalPERS are funding just these two banks as of 2011:

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CalPERS just happens to own 4,583,935 shares of Morgan Stanley, at a listed book value of $98,224,686 - and a market value of $105,476,344.

It also lists its direct stock ownership in JP Morgan Chase at 11,543,471 shares, with a book value of $292,151,725 – and a market value of $472,589,703.

TOTAL (book value) = $390,376,411
TOTAL (market value) =
$578,066,047

(Note: These are two separate companies, used here as examples.)

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This represents the ownership portion of stock that this single government pension fund “CalPERS” owns outright in these two banks. The conflict of interest should be apparent here, as this and all pension funds around the world depend upon a return (profits and dividends) from holding this stock investment, while at the same time being a part of the same government that regulates the banking industry. One does not necessarily want a major stock owner of a banking corporation also making the public laws, for instance, on real estate loans and the foreclosure process. But that is exactly what is happening here.

But we can’t stop here, for this is a massive list with many different types of investments into Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan Chase (as well as every significant bank on the planet). CalPERS also lists the following forms of taxpayer monies being given, loaned, or “bonded” to Morgan Stanley:

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(Page 4) “Domestic Cash Equivalents (securities)”

COLLATERL JP MORGAN CHASE - par/market value – $39,800,000 – listed at a measly 0.07% return, maturing 12/31/1949

MORGAN STANLEY REPO - par/market value – $66,500,000 - listed at a measly 0.04% return, maturing 12/31/1949

TOTAL (par/market value) = $106,300,000

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(Page 6-7) “Asset-Backed Securities”

CHASE ISSUANCE TRUST – par value – $1,865,000,000 – market value - $1,887,438,748 – 1.74% return, maturing 04/15/2014

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION – par value – $7,150,000 - market value - $2,532,394 - 1.32% return, maturing 01/25/2037.

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION – par value - $27,936 - market value - $8,166 - 0.91% return, maturing 08/25/2036.

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL INC - par value $95,008 - market value – $77,319 - 0.88% return, maturing 09/25/2034

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL INC – par value $2,660,000- market value – $1,866,197 - 0.69% return, maturing 12/25/2035

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL INC  - par value $2,921,764- market value – $2,537,286 - 0.58% return, maturing 11/25/2035

MORGAN STANLEY DEAN WITTER CAP - par value $292,899- market value – $111,961 - 8.53% return, maturing 11/25/2032

TOTAL (par value) = $1,878,147,607
TOTAL (market value) = $1,894,572,071

.

(Note that CalPERS gave these “loans” to Morgan Stanley, getting a horrible return on its investment, often less than 1% - and not getting that money paid back until as long as 2037 and beyond. This leaves Morgan Stanley and JP Morgan Chase to use and invest that money for more than 25 years for future massive profits and expansion. And if these banks lose it? No problem. The taxpayers are always there to bail them out! And your credit card from these same banks, which may be using some of this same CalPERS pension fund investment money to loan back to you via your credit card, personal, or mortgage loan, may have an interest rate as high as 24%!!!)

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(Page 14) “Corporate Bonds”

JPMC CAPITAL XVIII - par value $5,760,000 – market value - $5,740,3486.95% return, maturing 08/01/2066

JPMORGAN CHASE & CO - par value $96,000,000 - market value – $103,112,640 – 7.90% return, maturing 04/29/2049

JPMORGAN CHASE + CO - par value $1,600,000 - market value – $1,656,316 - 4.95% return, maturing 03/25/2020

JPMORGAN CHASE CAPT XX - par value $ 8,765,760 – market value – $8,734,555 - 6.55% returnmaturing 09/15/2066

MORGAN STANLEY – par value $56,640,000 – market value - $62,164,863  – 6.63% return, maturing 04/01/2018

MORGAN STANLEY – par value $45,120,000 – market value - $48,356,731 – 5.95% return, maturing 12/28/2017

MORGAN STANLEY - par value $48,000,000 – market value - $49,159,823 – 5.63% return, maturing 09/23/2019

MORGAN STANLEY – par value $870,000 – market value - $906,554 – 4.75% return, maturing 04/01/2014

MORGAN STANLEY – par value $2,870,000 – market value - $2,798,066 - 0.59% return, maturing 01/09/2014

MORGAN STANLEY DEAN WITTER - par value $1,130,000 – market value - $1,180,195 - 6.60% return, maturing 04/01/2012

TOTAL (par value) = $266,755,760
TOTAL (market value) = $283,810,091

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(Page 51-52) “Mortgage-Backed Securities”

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $308,972,643 - market value – $3,256,324 - 0.35% return, maturing 01/15/2042

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $32,928,000 - market value – $36,647,187 - 6.07% return, maturing 04/15/2045

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $70,560,000 - market value – $77,115,803 - 5.88% return, maturing 02/15/2051

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $274,891,936 - market value – $295,478,211 - 5.44% return, maturing 06/12/2047

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $18,816,000 – market value – $20,331,229 - 5.42% return, maturing 01/15/2049

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $1,085,000 - market value – $1,156,473 - 5.34% return, maturing 05/15/2047

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $1,700,000 - market value – $1,849,798 - 5.43% return, maturing 12/12/2043

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $30,209,893 - market value – $552,778 - 1.40% return, maturing 10/12/2037

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $109,863,895 - market value – $339,216 - 0.94% return, maturing 11/15/2035

JP MORGAN CHASE COMMERCIAL MOR - par value $25,783,365 - market value – $159,792 – 1.17% return, maturing 10/12/2035

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE TRUST – par value $858,671 - market value – $838,576 5.78% return, maturing – 04/25/2036

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE TRUST – par value $308,554 - market value – $260,083 – 2.77% return, maturing 07/25/2035

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE TRUST – par value $1,459,122 - market value – $1,304,019 - 2.78% return, maturing 06/25/2036

JP MORGAN MORTGAGE TRUST – par value $68,035 - market value – $66,727 - 2.96% return, maturing  11/25/2033

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL I - par value $98,784,000 – market value – $7,262,168 - 1.37% return, maturing 06/15/2044

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL I – par value $1,700,000 – market value - $1,789,567 - 5.57% return, maturing 12/15/2044

MORGAN STANLEY CAPITAL I – par value $47,040,000 - market value – $50,482,724 - 5.33% return, maturing 11/12/2041

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $670,407 - market value – $156,964 - 3.00% return, maturing 08/25/2034

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $561,385 - market value – $141,127 - 2.90% return, maturing 09/25/2034

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $1,307,796 - market value – $565,047 - 4.32% return, maturing 06/25/2037

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $4,008,030 - market value - $2,456,630 - 5.14% return, maturing 11/25/2037

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $18,201 - market value - $18,087 - 6.00% return, maturing 08/25/2037

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $1,712,350 - market value - $1,222,467 - 2.61% return, maturing 07/25/2035

MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE LOAN T – par value $364,015 - market value – $305,840 - 1.60% return, maturing 10/25/2034

TOTAL (par value) = $1,033,671,298
TOTAL (market value) = $958,096,837

(Yes, you read that correctly. You’ve heard about these mortgage-backed securities and you’ve probably wondered – who was buying all of these things anyway? Well now you know… your own government – with your own money! Your government not only allows these criminal junk securities to be legal and flourish in the banking and investment markets by law, but government also funds the whole financial mechanism so that banks can buy, sell, and resell and re-resell and re-re-resell and re-re-re-resell your mortgage contract until no one actually knows who has the original lien and deed on anyone’s home anymore. Again, government invests in corporations and funds their liquidity… and it benefits from your suffering and from the loss of your home when the bank forecloses. All that matters is that their stock investment and liquidity in the company has capital gains, creates interest, and pays dividends. And your personal ignorance of this is key to the whole operation.)

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(Page 57) “International Debt Securities”

MORGAN STANLEY - par value $4,000,000 -
market value - $5,417,906 - 1.71% return, maturing 04/13/2016

TOTAL (par value) = $4,000,000
TOTAL (market value) = $5,417,906

———————————————————————————————

So let’s total up these investments and loans and figure out just how much this one pension fund called CalPERS has invested into just these two conglomerate banks:

Direct Ownership Stock Holdings:

TOTAL (book value) = $390,376,411
TOTAL (market value) = $578,066,047

Domestic Cash Equivalents (securities)

TOTAL (par/market value) = $106,300,000

Asset-Backed Securities

TOTAL (par value) = $1,878,147,607
TOTAL (market value) = $1,894,572,071

Corporate Bonds

TOTAL (par value) = $266,755,760
TOTAL (market value) = $283,810,091

Mortgage-Backed Securities

TOTAL (par value) = $1,033,671,298
TOTAL (market value) = $958,096,837

International Debt Securities

TOTAL (par value) = $4,000,000
TOTAL (market value) = $5,417,906

——————————————————————–

TOTAL (par value) = $3,679,251,076
TOTAL (market value) = $3,826,262,952

——————————————————————–

It is important to understand here that this single pension fund has nearly $4 billion in directly apportioned investments within just these two banks. In reviewing thousands of other public pension fund “asset holding lists” we will find a similar pattern, from billions to millions and down into the smallest of pension funds with mere thousands. But collectively, when all of these funds are considered as one whole government investment scheme, we can easily see that the corporate world as it stands today would not exist without government funding through taxpayer and pension contributions to it, and directly because of these pension investments over the last several decades.

It is also important that we consider what are called “indirect” investments held by these pension funds. While direct stock and bond listings are very clear as to where that taxpayer money is invested, CalPERS (and all pension funds) also invest heavily into the private equity and mutual fund markets. In fact, as you can see, the pension and other government fund structures across the country are the main investors (institutional investors) within these private funds.

The problem? Those funds also invest into JP Morgan Chase, Morgan Stanley, and most other banks and investment houses. And so to get an accurate accounting of the % of investments that CalPERS actually has within these two financial institutions, we would have to audit its own investments in these private funds to find out where that private fund has placed CalPER’s investment income – and good luck with that!

Let’s see what CalPERS has in a few of these private equity funds…

——————————————————————–

State Street Corporation:

STATE STREET CORP – 1,777,017 shares of ownership stock at a market value of $80,125,697

“Corporate Bonds”

STATE STR CAP TR III  – par value $6,200,000 -
market value – $6,202,728 – 5.24% return, maturing 01/29/2049

——————————————————————–

Why is State Street Corporation important here?

From this CalPER’s report, it states:

“Our Investment Office staff, pension consultant Wilshire Associates, and State Street Bank & Trust, our master custodian, compiled the investment data presented on the next pages as required by the Public Employees’ Retirement Law.”

So CalPER’s pension fund owns stock in the banking institution that is its “master custodian”, and this bank is responsible for issuing the very report we are reading!!! Yet another blatant conflict of interest, in a bank that is not in a position to go against its stockholder without consequence!

Now let’s look at the Carlyle Group…

This investment giant is infamously connected to the George Bush family, who became president of the whole corporate government structure (not to mention his son), and as you can imagine continues to indirectly benefit heavily from government investments into this “group” – where he and his cronies acquire corporation after corporation with your taxpayer money…

Just what is The Carlyle Group?

“The Carlyle Group is an American-based global asset management firm, specializing in private equity, based in Washington D.C. The Carlyle Group operates in four business areas: corporate private equity, real assets, market strategies, and fund-of-funds, through its AlpInvest subsidiary. In its 2010 annual report, Carlyle reported assets in excess of $150 billion under management diversified over 84 distinct funds.The firm employs more than 890 employees, including 495 investment professionals, in 20 countries with offices in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Australia, and its portfolio companies employ more than 415,000 people worldwide. The firm has over 1,300 investment partners in 71 countries.

According to a 2011 ranking called the PEI 300 based on capital raised over the last five years, Carlyle was ranked as the third largest  private equity firm in the world, after TGP Capital and Goldman Sachs Principal Investment Area. Carlyle had been ranked first in the 2007 listing.

In 2001, the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) acquired a 5.5% holding in Carlyle’s management company for $175 million. The investment was valued at approximately $1 billion by 2007 at the height of the 2000′s buyout boom…

In November 2008, The Carlyle Group was named Private Equity firm of the year in the U.S. at the Financial Times-Mergermarket 2008 M&A Awards.

In March of 2009, New York State and federal authorities began an investigation into payments made by Carlyle and Riverstone to placement agents allegedly made in exchange for investments from the New York State Common Retirement System (NYSCRS), the state’s pension fund. It was alleged that these payments were in fact bribes or kickbacks, made to pension officials who have been under investigation by New York State Attorney General, Andrew Cuomo. In May of 2009, Carlyle agreed to pay $20 million in a settlement with Cuomo and accepted changes to its fund-raising practices. (Author’s note: Where did that money go, and what was the point – Carlyle Group certainly didn’t change its criminal methods. How did the people benefit? They didn’t.)

In 2010, the Financial Times announced that Carlyle Group is the private equity firm of the year…

In February 2008, a bill was introduced in California that would have barred CalPERS from investing money “with private-equity firms that are partly owned by countries with poor records on human rights,” which would include Carlyle because Mubadala Development is owned by part of the United Arab Emirates. The California bill was later withdrawn.”

George H. W. Bush, former U.S. President, served as Senior Adviser to the Carlyle Asia Advisory Board from April 1998 to October 2003 (while his son was still President!).

So what investments into the bonded liquidity base of the Carlyle Group does CalPERS have on its balance sheets, allowing Carlyle holding companies around the world to flourish with taxpayer investment capital?

——————————————————————–

The Carlyle Group

Alternative Investment Management Corporate Restructuring (securities)

Name of holding company…..
Book Value
……….Market Value

CARLYLE…………………………………………………
$22,892,350…………$55,040,942

CARLYLE ASIA PARTNERS GP II……………..
$123,783,417…………$127,894,756

CARLYLE ASIA PARTNERS III…………………
$140,997,939…………$149,682,813

CARLYLE ASIA PARTNERS LP…………………
$33,716,341……………$72,661,556

CARLYLE EUROPE PARTNERS II…………….
$33,781,818…………..$49,114,244

CARLYLE EUROPE PARTNERS III LP………
$275,068,958………..$269,585,374

CARLYLE GLB FIN SERV PARTNERS……….
$98,610,047………….$112,930,518

CARLYLE JAPAN INTL PARTNERS II……….
$111,350,716………….$101,874,064

CARLYLE JAPAN PARTNERS LP………………
$17,898,023………….$8,194,635

CARLYLE MANOR CARE………………………….
$13,128,107…………..$16,645,859

CARLYLE MEXICO PARTNERS………………..
$11,603,147……………$12,604,035

CARLYLE PARTNERS II LP………………………
$3 ,803,945…………..$7 ,150,317

CARLYLE PARTNERS III LP…………………….
$39,530,330…………..$20,698,248

CARLYLE PARTNERS IV, L.P……………………
$225,810,782…………$288,443,791

CARLYLE PARTNERS KINDER MORGAN…
$29,477,075…………..$68,215,645

CARLYLE PARTNERS V……………………………
$451,370,251………….$528,018,454

CARLYLE/RIVER RENE+ALT ENGY II …….
$140,853,360…………$163,748,816

CARLYLE/RIVERSTONE GLB E+P IV……….
$309,206,623………..$444,256,236

CARLYLE/RIVERSTONE GLOBAL……………
$195,614,177…………..$299,501,436

 “Alternative Investment Management Distressed Securities”

CARLYLE STRATEGIC PARTNERS…………..
$23,175,881…………….$34,972,657

CARLYLE STRATEGIC PARTNERS II ………
$58,002,997……………$79,704,250

CARLYLE/CALPERS CLO………………………..
$99,669…………………..$1,443,533

 “Alternative Investment Management Expansion Capital”

CARLYLE ASIA GROWTH PRTNRS IV……..
$40,863,278……………$48,175,768

CARLYLE ASIA GROWTH PRTNS III……….
$67,338,852…………….$67,445,066

CARLYLE GROUP……………………………………
$175,000,000………….$436,100,000

CARLYLE RIVERSTONE BRAZIL……………..
$17,362,588…………….$2,462,850

CARLYLE VENTURE PARTNERS III…………
$56,071,943…………….$64,646,861

CARLYLE/RIVERSTONEENERGYFDI,LP…
$54,262,246…………….$27,063,846

“Alternative Investment Management Special Situation”

CARLYLE EUROPE REALTY PARTNERS….
$11,107,976………………$7,178,856

CARLYLE REALTY III LP…………………………
$13,542,519………………$15,689,426

“Alternative Investment Management Venture Capital”

CARLYLE ASIA II LP……………………………….
$21,797,371……………….$2,737,812

CARLYLE EUROPE TECH PTNRS II………..
$57,274,489………………$50,288,690

CARLYLE VENTURE PRTNRS II LP…………
$40,025,303……………..$13,678,335

“Inflationary-Linked Assets”

CARLYLE INFRASTRUCTURE PARTNER..
$5,911,590…………………$51,033,705

——————————————————————————————————

TOTAL  BOOK VALUE OF INVESTMENTS IN
“CARLYLE GROUP” COMPANIES:
$2,920,334,108

TOTAL MARKET VALUE OF INVESTMENTS IN
“CARLYLE GROUP” COMPANIES:
$3,698,892,394

——————————————————————————————————

But we mustn’t forget about the subsidiary corporations owned by Carlyle Group, for these pension funds also purchase stock in these sub-corporations as well as their mother corporation – which can also be considered here as investments into the Carlyle Group itself:

BOOZ ALLEN HAMILTON HOLDING – 26,773 direct shares, market value - $511,632

CSX CORP - 3,245,673 direct shares, market value - $85,101,546

CSX CORPORATION (Corporate Bonds) -

CSX CORP – par value $22,272,000 – market value – $25,228,341 - 6.80% return, maturing 12/01/2028

CSX CORP – par value $35,299,200 – market value – $37,628,500 - 6.22% return, maturing 04/30/2040

CSX CORP – par value $1,920,000 – market value – $2,031,062 – 6.15% return, maturing 05/01/2037

HERTZ GLOBAL HOLDINGS INC – 1,404,911 direct shares, market value – $22,309,987

THE HERTZ CORPORATION (Corporate Bonds) -

HERTZ CORP – par value $554,280 – market value – $568,137 - 8.88% return, maturing 01/01/2014

HERTZ CORP - par value $480,000 – market value – $494,400 - 7.50% return, maturing 10/15/2018

HERTZ CORP - par value $1,920,000 – market value – $1,953,600 - 7.38% return, maturing 01/15/2021

HERTZ CORP - par value $2,400,000 – market value – $2,376,000 - 6.75% return, maturing 04/15/2019

LOEWS CORP – 1,086,790 direct shares, market value – $45,742,991

QINETIQ GROUP PLC – 2,078,385 direct shares, market value – $4,027,451

——————————————————————————————————

Finally, lets see what CalPERS has invested in Goldman Sachs…

——————————————————————————————————

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC 1,489,274 direct shares, market value – $198,207,477

GOLDMAN SACHS – “Corporate Bonds”

GOLDMAN SACHS CAP III – par value $3,620,000 - market value – $2,752,503 - 1.02% return, maturing 09/29/2049

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC – par value $110,400,000 – market value – $108,809,563 - 6.75% return, maturing 10/01/2037

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC – par value $4,800,000 – market value – $5,589,452 - 7.50% return, maturing 02/15/2019

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC  – par value $13,440,000 - market value – $12,763,456 - 5.95% return, maturing 01/15/2027

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC – par value $19,200,000 – market value – $19,281,299 - 6.25% return, maturing 02/01/2041

GOLDMAN SACHS GROUP INC – par value $14,400,000 – market value – $14,788,437 - 5.38% return, maturing 03/15/2020

 ——————————————————————————————————

These direct stock investments, as I’ve covered in depth before, represent a massive controlling stake in the corporate world, both national and international. And equally as relevant to the corporate takeover of the world, we can see that these “alternative” investments and corporate bonds literally give taxpayer money to the private industries that the government is a major or controlling stock owner of.

In other words, the taxpayers are unwittingly contributing to everything they complain about in the corporate world – to everything that is slowly killing their health and their spirit. Food, chemical, pharmaceutical, medical, banking, insurance, real estate, foreign currency, private equity funds, and everything else under the sun.

–=–

What Could Happen?

–=–

To put this into perspective, a horrific thought just occurred to me…

As of this moment, in July of 2012, these pension systems are owned and operated by local, state, federal government municipal corporations, and administered by their corporate boards for what they claim to be “on behalf of the employees” that contribute to them under federal and state pension laws. And like any private pension system out there, these corporations are at risk of bankruptcy, government raids, credit risks, or other purposeful mismanagement’s that might befall the public, government owned and controlled pension system.

So what would happen to all of these direct ownership stock investments in a worse case scenario – if the government decided to raid and kill the pension system all together?

What would happen to those stocks, and what would become of the debt that these private corporations owe the government (the people) if all of a sudden the whole thing came crashing down?

The answer to these questions, in this authors perspective, would be the final nail in the 4-decade long efforts to completely privatize our government. It would mean that those stock certificates that are held by each of these pension funds would either be transferred into private hands, or they would be sold off for pennies on the dollar in a false-flag depression scenario to the worst of either these private corporations or to some other individual or country. In short, it would mean the largest transfer of wealth out of the public’s hands in recorded history, including real estate, foreign currencies, stocks and bonds, precious metals, and the many other assets within.

But that’s not all folks… for all of those corporate bonds would also change hands, being transferred or sold off – possibly to the very private banking institutions that were the beneficiaries of those corporate bond and securities-type loans in the first place. In other words, the debts would never come back to the pensioners/taxpayers that loaned it in the first place (the public), but instead would be paid back by the corporations to the corporations themselves, ultimately equating to a grand theft of massive proportions via the loss to the taxpayers as the corporations pay themselves back for the debt against themselves as owners of their own debt… a paradox, and yet quite reasonable to these organized criminals.

This would be no different than the Public Private Partnerships (PPP) happening all over the country now, where parking garages, toll-roads, bridges, and other public infrastructure has been sold or “privatized” into the hands of banks and other private corporations – who now operate and collect the tolls and taxes for the infrastructure that was built by our forefathers and our children.

One could go crazy thinking about this…

For it would not take much at all to accomplish this feat. For federal pensions, as part of the Executive branch, a simple executive order might be signed by the president directing the liquidation of the pension system to pay for the “national debt”. On the State and local levels, simple bankruptcy proceedings would do the job, and the people and pensioners would be left out in the cold. After all, the taxpayer portion of the pension system is government property.

This extremely viable possibility could easily be implemented as the solution to the reaction to the problem of the lie that is continuously perpetrated on the American public – that the pension system is on a whole entirely underfunded. In two years of looking, I’ve yet to see a pension fund that meets this criteria, per the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. This lie stems from the actuarial projections (educated and purposefully misleading guess) on the future potential of pension funds. It has nothing to do with reality, and this is easily verified in the CAFR.

The following capital gains for 2010 were stated by the following public pension systems:

New York State Retirement System – $23.3 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

CalPERS – $22.7 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

CalSTRS – $11.3 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

Texas State Teachers Retirement System – $7 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

New York City Retirement – $3.4 billion gain in net assets after all benefits paid.

The pension system is, as you can see here, responsible for globalism at its finest. It is responsible for war, for famine, for disease, and for hunger. The whole world could be fed and clothed 100 times over with just the over $260 billion of investment wealth found in the CalPERS pension fund.

But while the pension system is responsible for these things around the globe, it is the people of America that are responsible for the funding of pension funds. Looking the other way in ignorance and greed must come to an end before the worst happens. The people must take responsibility for their own investment concerns, not relying on government to do it for them. The people must invest in what will benefit all people – from alternative energy to real cures for disease. Personal responsibility is the only solution we the people have left; and if we don’t choose to take responsibility for our own lives, our mother who calls itself government and calls us “customers” and “dependents” will continue down this road until just a few conglomerate corporations remain – as government privatizes and merges its investment held corporate structure into one giant United Nations IMF World Bank holding company.

In the end, I can only ask you to look at this report, and to see where your pension and taxpayer money is being invested… I can only ask:

What will you do tomorrow, knowing that your pension contributions are funding poverty and the the global war machine?

On a mission to document our enslavement to ourselves by our own consent…

.

–Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)
–Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Walter Burien: The Only Game In Town


Thankfully, my esteemed mentor, teacher, and friend has released his documentary free for public consumption.

He asks to only link the video, not copy, as the DVD will be for sale soon.

Please support him if you can at his website:

CAFR1.COM

.

–Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)
–October 1, 2011

CAFR Confession


A friend and listener to our local AM station took our interview with the mayor of Salt Lake County, where he admits to the county CAFR and over $650 million in extra fund balances. He also included the CAFR pages I read from as reference.

Though I already posted the interview (audio only), I feel like this is the most important public official confession as to the wealth of the government as shown in government’s financial statements.

Please pass this on…

-

Also, learn more about government Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFR’s) with CAFR School, here:

-

Part 1: The State of Wisconsin CAFR -

https://realitybloger.wordpress.com/2011/03/01/wisconsins-real-financial-situation-explained/

-

Part 2: Introduction to CAFR – City of Aurora, Co -

https://realitybloger.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/cafr-school-a-lesson-in-financial-accounting/

-

Part 3: Advanced study – State of Minnesota CAFR -

https://realitybloger.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/cafr-school-part-2-minnesotas-state-cafrs-explained/

-

Now compare these to your own local, county state, and school district CAFR’s.

.

–Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)
–Tuesday, July 12, 2011

 

 

 

 

Government’s Conflict Of Interest


As I was going through my emails, I got yet another request from someone who wanted me to sign a petition to send to my political “representative” in office, asking politely to stop funding big oil companies. I sighed in disillusionment, trying to think of a way to make people understand that this form of political action is absolutely useless in a corporate government.

I am so saddened as of late that these types of “petitions” are the focus of so much wasted energy. Writing, calling, and even worse… emailing your “representative” in this kind of futile effort is the worst part of our mutually controlled opposition. The sense of satisfaction and patriotism that is felt by these actions is indeed exactly the desired effect of these actions. They accomplish nothing, and yet makes whole groups feel a sense of accomplishment. A petition has NO legal jurisdiction. A letter is scanned and then filed in the trash, while emails are dumped into a folder on a digital archive never to be seen again.

What a game we play – pawns moving around exactly as we are lead, never changing anything, begging our masters to do what’s right and to start representing us. It’s pathetic!

Don’t you understand? The government owns Exxon Mobile. It has controlling stock interest in the company. It owns British Petroleum, Chevron, and any other petroleum based companies you can think of. If it didn’t have a major or controlling financial interest in BP, that gulf oil spill would have been immediately cleaned up! It wouldn’t have cost the government anything to force this corporation to clean up its mess.

Don’t you Understand? Of course the government gives billions and billions in R&D grants to Pharmaceuticals and medical companies. Government owns those as well, both national and international. It hands these subsidies to these companies because it is profitable for government!!! It must do this to justify its tax collections.

Don’t you understand? They wont stop giving their own profitable businesses subsidies (taxpayer money) just because you say pretty please. They wont stop making a profit to save a few square miles of farmland or housing. And they certainly wont change anything just because a bunch of pussified patriots sign a piece of paper demanding it.

And so, I have compiled this list of just the New York State Retirement Fund’s holdings in Pharmaceuticals, oil companies, the media, and other industries. This is only one out of over 200,000 governments, Federal, state, and local. And if just one single government owns this much in these companies, the answers to the following questions should be as clear as day… government owns and profits from these corporations, and passes the laws which regulate them and to guarantee those profits, regardless of what the public wants. The answer to all questions is simple… it’s just business.

Why are pharmaceuticals and medical companies out of control and killing people? Why is cancer the number one most profitable business, despite proven cures? Why are vaccines soon to be mandatory without one shred of evidence as to them being medically sound? Why are banks allowed to charge practically unlimited interest despite usury laws? Why are banks allowed to foreclose on millions and millions of homes? Why are banks allowed to ignore state laws in lieu of federal laws? Why are products made in China all over the stinking place? Why are dangerous and poisonous products being imported into America? Why is the American market so saturated with foreign products? Why was Exxon and BP not required to clean up their historical oil spills? Why is oil still being used when such vast and wonderful alternatives are all around us? Why is the media lying and misinforming us at every turn, supporting government in every way?

All of these questions are answered by this simple realization…

Government owns it all!!!

Government is in a direct conflict of interest by being major majority shareholder (owner) of all significant corporations, both foreign and domestic.

The following is the New York Pension System holdings in major corporations around the world in 2009. This incomplete list and a 2010 list can be downloaded here:

http://www.osc.state.ny.us/retire/about_us/annual_report_2010/index.php

I challenge you to find a company this government doesn’t own stock in!

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Company                                   # of shares            Market Value 2009

–Oil and Energy–

Exxon Mobil Corp                           18,125,534              1,234,348,865
Chevron Corp                                    7,698,784                  517,666,219
ConocoPhillips                                 6,003,030                 235,078,655
Schlumberger Ltd                            4,624,733                  187,856,654
BP plc – Sponsored ADR                   202,055                      8,102,406
Royal Dutch Shell plc – A                1,816,523                   40,904,335
Royal Dutch Shell plc – A               2,842,162                   63,886,007
Royal Dutch Shell plc – A                    84,900                      3,761,070
Royal Dutch Shell plc – B                     35,812                       1,561,761
Royal Dutch Shell plc – B                1,553,412                   34,088,987
American Electric Power Co Inc    1,785,207                   45,094,329
PG&E Corp                                         1,249,975                    47,774,045
Questar Corp                                        802,950                   23,630,819
Occidental Petroleum Corp             2,913,414                  162,131,489
Walter Energy Inc                                188,400                    4,308,708
Rio Tinto Ltd                                         136,488                     5,364,638
Rio Tinto plc                                          352,517                    11,874,086
Praxair Inc                                           1,153,745                   77,635,501
Marathon Oil Corp                           2,683,221                   70,541,880
Southwest Gas Corp                            129,220                     2,722,665
Southwestern Energy Company    1,532,452                   45,498,500
National Oilwell Varco Inc             1,757,094                   50,446,169
National Fuel Gas Company             290,140                     8,898,594
Murphy Oil Corp                                 849,129                    38,015,505
Petro-Canada                                        315,730                     8,499,603
Petro-Canada                                         49,900                      1,326,342
Petrohawk Energy Corp                       60,100                       1,155,723
Petrol Ofisi A.S.                                   268,128                          612,205
Petroleo Brasileiro – ADR                     2,330                            70,995
Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. – ADR          88,940                      2,179,030
El Paso Corp                                     2,900,913                    18,130,706
El Paso Electric Company                 104,540                      1,472,969
Petroleum Development Corp            32,465                         383,412
Petroplus Holdings AG                       118,882                     1,673,894
Petroquest Energy Inc                         88,900                         213,360
FirstEnergy Corp                               1,146,792                   44,266,171
Diamond Offshore Drilling Inc         324,678                  20,409,259
Frontier Oil Corp                                  721,302                     9,225,453
Forest Laboratories Inc                   1,580,235                   34,701,961
Forest Oil Corp                                     367,300                    4,829,995
Gulfmark Offshore Inc                         28,900                        689,554
Gulfport Energy Corp                            11,000                          25,520
Gas Natural SDG                                   116,361                     1,589,728
OGE Energy Corp                                385,853                      9,191,018
Oil & Natural Gas Corp Ltd                547,011                      8,411,905
Oil Search Ltd                                    2,186,952                    7,992,540
Cairn Energy plc                                   475,999                  14,839,441
Oil States International Inc               188,040                    2,523,497
Electricite De France (EDF)              505,068                  19,805,545
Gaz De France                                       863,514                  29,636,703
Scottish & Southern Energy plc          511,473                    8,130,299
Tokyo Electric Power Company         359,150                    8,945,115
Tokyo Electron Ltd                               363,650                  13,401,701
Tokyo Gas Company                         2,375,746                    8,298,394
China Petroleum Chemical             3,982,000                   2,548,480
China Power Int Dvlp Ltd               6,012,000                     1,194,643
China Coal Energy Company             416,000                       307,035
China Oilfield Services                        212,000                        167,685
China Shenhua Energy Co                  341,000                       768,240
Chiyoda Chemical Engineering         935,400                    4,962,535
Chubu Electric Power Co Inc              241,917                     5,314,973
Shanghai Electric Grp Co Ltd      12,052,000                    3,467,866
Shinsei Bank Ltd                               1,450,154                      1,453,531
Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd          41,500                        344,958
China Coal Energy Company – H     416,000                        307,035
Hong Kong & China Gas Co Ltd    5,485,330                     8,649,127
Hong Kong Electric Holds Ltd      3,200,500                   18,996,516
Mitsubishi Electric Corp                 3,036,548                   13,557,939
Mitsubishi Gas Chemical CO Inc          4,000                          17,009

–Automobile Industry–

General Motors Corp                       1,869,290                    3,626,423
Ford Motor Company                      7,547,012                   19,848,642
Toyota Motor Company                  1,764,412                    55,735,197
Toyota Industries Corp                       177,163                      3,757,786
Toyota Tsusho Corp                           143,200                       1,371,542
Honda Motor – ADR                         188,000                     4,455,600
Honda Motor Company                 1,297,926                    30,421,167
Mazda Motor Corp                             715,000                       1,187,203
Nissan Motors Japanese Ord       4,282,864                     15,176,697
Mitsubishi Corp                                  859,769                     11,185,615
Mitsubishi Motors Corp                    271,000                         342,969
Hyundai Motor Company Ltd           30,860                      1,238,193
Volvo AB – A Shares                             81,950                         434,170
Volvo AB – B Shares                           183,135                         968,031
Volkswagen AG                                     21,483                     6,560,285
Volkswagen AG – Preferred               16,006                         921,026
Harley-Davidson Inc                          796,512                   10,665,296
Yamaha Corp                                         42,813                         414,823
Yamaha Motor Company Ltd          184,000                     1,630,050
CarMax Inc                                       1,128,900                    14,043,516
Advance Auto Parts Inc                    492,883                   20,247,634

–Pharmaceuticals and Healthcare–

Abbott Laboratories                      5,864,256                  279,725,011
Baxter International Inc               2,975,728                  152,416,788
Bayer AG                                             799,730                   38,861,936
Pfizer Inc                                      26,880,813                  366,116,673
Eli Lilly & Company                     3,904,933                  130,463,812
Merck & Company Inc                  7,814,727                 209,043,947
Merck KGaA                                       159,294                    14,041,129
Teva Pharmaceutical Ind Ltd         613,430                   27,635,022
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company 8,358,967                 183,228,557
Metlife Inc                                        3,135,011                   71,384,200
Colgate-Palmolive Company        1,968,159                 116,082,018
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co              8,358,967                 183,228,557
Roche Holding AG – Genuss          930,152                   127,777,796
Roche Holdings Ltd – ADR              49,000                      1,682,807
Gilead Sciences Inc                       3,936,647                 182,345,489
Glaxosmithkline plc                      6,465,941                 100,789,027
Glaxosmithkline plc – ADR              32,400                     1,006,668
Novartis AG – ADR                           145,280                     5,495,942
Novartis AG – Regular                 2,664,079                 100,935,336
Noven Pharmaceuticals Inc            452,987                      4,294,317
Amgen Inc                                       4,272,238                  211,561,226
Sanofi-Aventis                                2,421,930                 136,276,979
Sanofi-Aventis – ADR                        81,400                     2,273,502
Astrazeneca                                          22,055                         773,644
Astrazeneca plc                               1,833,135                   64,400,614
Astrazeneca plc – Spons. ADR         123,711                      4,385,555
3M Company                                   2,536,317                  126,105,681
UnitedHealth Group Inc              4,777,620                   99,995,587
Tenet Healthcare Corp                 2,636,132                      3,057,913
Pharmaceutical Prod Dvlpmt Inc  678,871                    16,102,820
Pharmerica Corp                                 98,534                      1,639,606
Humana Inc                                       930,895                   24,277,742
St Jude Medical Inc                        1,575,296                  57,230,504
AMN Healthcare Services                125,274                        638,897
American Medical Sys Holds. Inc  259,590                    2,894,429
American Physicians Capital Inc     26,420                     1,081,106
Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc          470,779                   14,645,935
RehabCare Group Inc                         92,232                    1,608,526
Reinsurance Grp of America Inc    522,133                   16,911,888
Univ Health Serv Inc – Class B       203,950                    7,819,443
Basilea Pharmaceutica                       48,480                    3,027,202
Savient Pharmaceuticals Inc             91,058                        450,737
Nationwide Health Propts Inc        375,204                    8,325,777
National Health Investors Inc           12,700                        341,249
Natus Medical Inc                                77,400                       658,674
Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd       290,158                    4,876,605
Shire Pharmaceuticals Group         277,100                    9,958,974
Health Care Reit Inc                         393,735                  12,044,354
Health Mangmnt Asc Inc – Cls A   797,100                    2,056,518
Health Net Inc                                   409,340                    5,927,243
Healthcare Realty Trust Inc              28,015                        419,945
Healthcare Services Group Inc       194,790                    2,916,006
HealthSpring Inc                               309,519                    2,590,674
Healthways Inc                                  233,425                    2,047,137
MedCath Corp                                      41,245                        299,851
Medco Health Solutions Inc       2,204,279                   91,124,894
Medical Properties Trust Inc          125,700                       458,805
Mediceo Holdings Company Ltd     56,700                       603,338
Medicines Company                             5,400                         58,536
Medicis Pharma Corp – Class A    370,640                    4,584,817
Medtronic Inc                                4,208,522                124,025,143

–Banks and Investments–

Morgan Stanley                              4,301,770                   97,951,303
Goldman Sachs Group Inc/The   1,961,585                207,967,242
Goldman Sachs Ssga Em Mrkts  8,934,287                102,501,423
Wells Fargo & Company             16,257,120                 231,501,389
Bank of America Corp                 23,819,237                 162,447,196
Citigroup Inc                                 18,601,505                  47,061,808
Citigroup Inc Depository Shares    199,368                    3,046,343
American Express Company       4,249,664                  57,922,920
American Financial Group Inc       492,854                    7,910,307
Visa Inc – Class A                              390,400                 21,706,240
Mastercard Inc – Class A                 306,830                 51,387,888
Zions BanCorp                                   558,029                   5,485,425
Fifth Third Bancorp                       2,678,672                    7,821,722
Fannie Mae                                             6,000                           4,200
Freddie Mac                                            6,100                            4,636
Hartford Financ Serv Grp Inc      1,099,070                   8,627,700
Hudson City Bancorp Inc             2,946,851                 34,448,688
Western Union Company             2,656,147                  33,387,768
Siemens AG                                         757,252                  43,473,647
Experian Group Ltd                        1,034,174                    6,474,091
Equifax Inc                                           626,161                  15,309,636
Equinix Inc                                             13,800                       774,870
State Street Corp                             1,867,120                  57,469,954
People’s United Financial Inc      1,234,207                  22,178,700
Fidelity Nat Financial Inc – Cls A  839,867                  16,385,805
Fidelity Nat Info Services Inc          657,748                   11,971,014
Westpac Banking Corp                     298,305                   3,956,638
Axis Bank Ltd                                      191,458                     1,565,891
Discover Financial Services          1,874,548                  11,828,398
Softbank Corp                                 3,664,300                 46,596,748
Solera Holdings Inc                           556,652                  13,793,837
Signature Bank                                   210,333                    5,937,701
HSBC Holdings plc                        8,349,382                  47,271,967
HSBC Holdings plc                        1,389,200                    7,645,081
HSBC Holdings plc – Rights            893,766                   1,806,322
Royal Bank of Canada                       169,300                   4,949,214
Royal Bank of Scotland                 6,330,271                   2,223,006
Royal Bank of Scotland, Rights   6,427,941                                 -0-
Allied Irish Banks                            1,216,447                      969,046
National Australia Bank                1,406,252                 19,638,984
Aust & New Zealand Bank Group   701,045                    7,671,606
Commonwealth Bank of Australia    19,794                       477,637
National Bank of Canada                  161,300                    5,161,497
National Bank of Greece                  102,386                     1,551,051
Deutsche Bank AG – ADR                    9,800                      398,370
Deutsche Bank AG – Registered     654,969                26,888,105
Credit Suisse Group                        1,174,244                 35,793,762
Credit Suisse Group – Spons ADR         300                           9,147
Bank Montreal Quebec                     428,291                  11,230,235
Bank Mutual Corp                               94,860                       859,432
Bank of Baroda                                   542,734                   2,506,942
Bank of Communications             1,376,000                       955,210
Bank of Cyprus Ltd                              51,909                        157,826
Bank of East Asia                           2,605,019                    5,028,527
Bank of Hawaii Corp                         192,499                    6,348,617
Bank of India                                      934,270                   4,040,186
Bank of New York Mellon Corp  4,420,585                124,881,526
Credit Agricole S.A.                            311,625                    3,439,044
Credit Saison Company                       14,918                        144,241
Bank of Nova Scotia                          149,900                     3,701,779
First Bancorp Puerto Rico                143,010                       609,223
Bank Yokohama Ltd Japan Ord     903,100                    3,821,968
Hiroshima Bank Ltd/The                   13,000                         49,357
Bank of Kyoto Ltd/The                       73,000                       614,924
Osaka Gas Company Ltd               2,035,146                   6,346,309
Bank of China Ltd – H                   8,527,000                   2,827,663
Ind Comm Bank of China Ltd      4,464,000                   2,321,280
China Citic Bank – H                        484,000                       182,983
China Construction Bank – H      4,331,000                   2,458,890
China Merchants Bank – H             283,000                      494,428
Shizuoka Bank                                    183,000                    1,637,866
Shinsei Bank Ltd                             1,450,154                     1,453,531
Chiba Bank                                          176,500                       866,685
Cheung Kong (Holdings)              3,376,000                  29,077,161
Hang Seng Bank Ltd                         328,500                    3,308,313
Hanmi Financial Corp                        55,300                           71,890
Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Grp     6,409,847                 30,890,829
Mitsubishi UFJ Lease & Fin Co Ltd    1,600                          33,370
Bangkok Bank                                    554,400                      1,172,424
Bangkok Bank Public Co Ltd          446,200                         937,316
Siam Comm Bank Public Co Ltd    376,900                         579,192
Malayan Banking Berhad                802,525                         849,745
Malayan Banking Berhad – Rights  361,136                                 -0-
Blackrock Inc                                           7,135                         927,835
Blackstone Group Lp/The             1,289,215                     9,346,809
Zurich Financial Services                      9,387                     1,486,829
Aetna Inc                                           1,881,924                   45,787,211
Cincinnati Financial Corp                 736,150                   16,835,751
First American Corp                           496,770                  13,169,373
First Bancorp Puerto Rico                 143,010                       609,223
First Cash Financial Services Inc      48,800                       728,096
First Commonwealth Finan Corp   394,940                     3,503,118
First Financial – 144A GDR                 48,113                       444,083
First Financial Bancorp                        62,100                       591,813
First Financial Bankshares Inc           54,475                    2,624,061
First Financial Holding Company   978,455                        451,546
First Financial Holdings Inc               23,950                       183,218
First Horizon National Corp              766,191                  8,228,888
First Mercury Financial Corp            213,900                  3,088,716
First Midwest Bancorp Inc                280,825                   2,412,287
First Niagara Financial Group Inc   414,400                   4,516,960
First Potomac Realty Trust                  75,284                      553,337
First Quantum Minerals Ltd                 6,400                      180,583
First Solar Inc                                        39,400                   5,228,380
Discover Financial Services            1,874,548                 11,828,398

–The Media–

Walt Disney Company/The             7,975,404               144,833,337
News Corp – Class A                          7,746,798                 51,283,803
Time Warner Cable Inc                     1,476,825                 36,625,251
Time Warner Inc                               4,885,448                 94,289,152
CBS Corp – Class B                            3,518,760                 13,512,038
General Electric Company              39,551,471              399,865,372
Sony Corp                                                811,290                 16,411,435
Sony Financial Holdings Inc                         24                       63,906
Vivendi Universal                               2,414,568               63,876,002
Viacom Inc – Class B                         2,363,387                41,075,666
Discovery Commun Inc – Series A       79,244                  1,269,489
Discovery Commun Inc – Series C       78,831                   1,154,874
Marvel Entertainment Inc                    175,800                 4,667,490
Comcast Corp – Class A                   10,473,672             142,860,886
Comcast Corp – Special Class A            20,259                     260,733
DreamWorks Anim SKG Inc – A        285,700                  6,182,548
DISH Network Corp – Class A             475,200                 5,279,472
DIRECTV Group Inc/The                 2,048,939               46,695,320
Dolby Laboratories Inc – Class A         419,110                14,295,842
British Sky Broadcasting                   3,626,650               22,534,452
Deluxe Corp                                            263,202                  2,534,635
Warner Music Group Corp                     16,700                       39,245
Virgin Media Inc                                    280,696                  1,347,341
New York Times Company/The          356,178                  1,609,925
Cinemark Holdings Inc                         373,718                  3,509,212
Hitachi Ltd                                           5,368,600               14,458,313
Fujifilm Holdings Corp                         378,094                  8,134,553
Netflix Inc                                                225,586                  9,682,151
NETGEAR Inc                                           68,745                     828,377
Gamestop Corp – Class A                      913,536                25,597,279
Ticketmaster Entertainment Inc           74,000                    273,060
Tokyo Broadcasting System Hold Inc  18,900                     247,612

–Food and Beverage–

Monsanto Company                           2,280,249            189,488,692
General Mills Inc                                  1,369,515               68,311,408
H.J. Heinz Company                            1,255,221               41,497,606
Hershey Company/The                          609,148               21,167,893
ConAgra Foods Inc                               1,997,457               33,697,100
Dr Pepper Snapple Group Inc              865,369               14,633,390
Coca-Cola West Japan                               3,500                       55,847
Coca-Cola Amatil                                      42,075                     253,456
Coca-Cola Company/The                   7,633,116              335,475,448
Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc                  1,613,637                21,283,872
Pepsi Bottling Group Inc/The              756,262                16,743,641
PepsiAmericas Inc                                  349,239                 6,024,373
Pepsico Inc                                            6,512,462             335,261,544
Groupe Danone                                       231,868                11,285,823
Nutrisystem Inc                                        59,400                     847,638
AES Corp/The                                      2,510,794                14,587,713
Cracker Barrel Old Cntry Store Inc       50,067                  1,433,919
McDonald’s Corp                                4,406,583             240,467,234
Wendys/Arbys Group Inc – Class A 1,743,327                 8,768,935
Safeway Inc                                           2,981,340              60,193,255
Cosco Corp Singapore Ltd                    320,000                    172,609
Cosco Pacific Ltd                                  1,704,000                1,682,013
Smiths Group plc                                  1,327,512               12,729,661
Tesco                                                     12,932,819              61,803,212
Smithfield Foods Inc                              489,493                4,630,604
Smucker (J M) Company/The              545,201               20,319,641
Darden Restaurants Inc                         527,787               18,081,983
Yum! Brands Inc                                   2,110,315               57,991,456

–Telecom/Cellphone–

AT&T Inc                                             22,256,707            560,869,016
Verizon Communications Inc          10,831,468            327,110,334
Sprint Nextel Corp                                9,777,244             34,904,759
Motorola Inc                                          9,547,354             40,385,307
Qwest Communications Int Inc         4,735,734              16,196,210
Vodafone Group plc – Spons ADR        109,595                1,909,145
Vodafone Group plc New                 56,080,988            98,670,972
Samsung Electronics Company Ltd          4,489               1,843,305
Ericsson LM Tele Co – Spons ADR       126,820               1,025,974
Ericsson LM Tele Co – B Shares         7,402,571            60,439,750
Nokia Oyj                                               2,005,360             23,643,146
Nokia Oyj Corp – Sponsored ADR         151,200               1,764,504
Manitoba Telecom Services Inc              38,800                  985,304
Singapore Telecommun Ltd             23,712,699              39,463,971
France Telecom S.A.                             4,161,013              94,746,495
Deutsche Telekom AG – Registered 5,484,668             68,232,281
Tele Norte Leste Part – ADR                   770,711             10,666,640
Tele2 AB – B Shares                                   66,884                  562,268
Telecom Corp of New Zealand           3,833,489               4,988,558
Telecom Egypt                                          133,000                   350,087
Telecom Italia – RNC                           1,380,285                1,404,691
Telecom Italia S.p.A.                           11,019,457              14,206,248
Telecommunication Sys Inc – Class A  411,900                 3,777,123
Teleflex Inc                                                144,400                5,644,596
Telefonica S.A.                                      5,056,407            100,835,142
Telefonos De Mexico                            1,746,900                1,326,618
Telefonos De Mexico S.A. – ADR         294,600               4,430,784
Telekom Austria                                    1,067,724              16,160,836
Telekom Malaysia Berhad                   1,383,000               1,335,389
Telekomunikacja Polska S.A.                   48,243                   257,585
Telekomunikasi Tbk PT                       1,385,900                  905,543
Telemig Celular Participacoes – ADR       1,959                     69,819
Telenor ASA                                           3,379,464              19,269,466
Telephone & Data Systems Inc             392,880              10,415,249
Teletech Holdings Inc                             533,062               5,805,045
Television Francaise (T.F.1)                     42,095                  329,804
Teliasonera AB                                      1,050,823               5,033,396
Telkom South Africa                                  74,690                  828,501

–Other Corporations of Note–

Diebold Inc                                        234,830              5,013,621
Halliburton Company                          3,077,890              47,614,958
Raytheon Company                               1,727,827              67,281,583
Hewlett-Packard Company                9,304,769            298,310,894
Home Depot Inc/The                          7,208,920             169,842,155
Fedex Corp                                             1,230,967               54,765,722
Allstate Corp/The                                 2,187,843               41,897,193
Amazon.Com Inc                                   1,316,841              96,708,803
Macy’s Inc                                              1,568,938               13,963,548
Sears Holdings Corp                                213,759                 9,770,924
Procter & Gamble Company/The   10,837,108              510,319,416
Johnson & Johnson                           10,447,583             549,542,866
Du Pont (E I) De Nemours & Co       3,521,463               78,634,269
Dow Chemical Company/The          4,280,075                36,081,032
Dun & Bradstreet Corp/The                 207,093                15,946,161
Staples Inc                                              2,512,085               45,493,859
Alcoa Inc                                                  3,117,832              22,884,887
Canon Inc                                              2,236,920               63,866,704
Canon Marketing Japan Inc                   35,500                     498,157
Hitachi Ltd                                           5,368,600                14,458,313
Caterpillar Inc                                       2,111,648                59,041,678
H&R Block Inc                                      1,177,370                 21,416,360

–Computers and Internet–

Microsoft Corp                                  28,680,246              526,856,119
Apple Inc                                               3,324,449             349,466,079
Texas Instruments Inc                       5,083,728                83,932,349
Google Inc – Class A                               974,378              339,142,007
Yahoo! Inc                                              5,126,172                65,666,263
Yahoo! Japan Corp                                      4,716                   1,235,222
Intel Corp                                            22,345,858             336,305,163
Dell Inc                                                    7,713,130                73,120,472
International Business Mach Corp  5,099,897              494,129,020
McAfee Inc                                                758,725                 25,417,288
Palm Inc                                                    401,500                  3,460,930
Oracle Corp                                         13,566,613               245,148,697
Oracle Corp Japan                                  192,600                   7,253,944
NVIDIA Corp                                        2,001,337                 19,733,183
Advanced Micro Devices Inc             1,847,932                   5,636,193
Cisco Systems Inc                             23,320,806              391,089,917
Intuit Inc                                               1,339,099                 36,155,673
Microchip Technology Inc                    756,250                16,024,938
Micron Technology Inc                      3,774,261                  15,323,500
Micros Systems Inc                                235,060                  4,407,375
Casio Computer Japanese Ordinary     91,200                      639,887
Electronic Arts Inc                               1,162,420                 21,144,420
Activision Blizzard Inc                           961,705                 10,059,434
THQ Inc                                                     123,910                      376,686

–Alcohol, Coffee, and Cigarettes–

Starbucks Corp                                     2,453,460                 27,257,941
Peet’s Coffee & Tea Inc                             23,620                      510,664
Green Mntain Coffee Roasters Inc      272,425                 13,076,400
Imperial Tobacco Group plc              1,426,448                32,038,870
Philip Morris International Inc         6,731,683               239,513,281
British American Tobacco                   1,137,258                 26,293,331
Lorillard Inc                                             568,189                 35,079,989
Reynolds American Inc                         582,000                20,858,880
Altria Group Inc                                   6,925,183                110,941,432
Molson Coors Brewing Co – Class B   568,782                 19,497,847
Anheuser-Busch InBev Npv                  709,929                 19,553,671
Anheuser-Busch InBev – Strip VVPR 225,008                             896
Seagrams (is owned by Vivendi Universal)  (See Media Listing)
Boston Beer Co Inc/The – Class A          21,950                     457,877
Brown-Forman Corp – Class B              391,530               15,203,110
Castle A. M. & Company                          39,400                     351,448
Constellation Brands Inc – Class A      768,209                  9,141,687
Diageo plc                                                  907,367               10,229,018
Fortune Brands Inc                                  715,098               17,555,656
Heineken Holding Nv – Class A            386,719                9,390,942
Heineken Nv                                            206,448                 5,865,762
Pernod Ricard S.A.                                  353,388               19,694,387

–The Stock Market (corporations)–

NYSE Euronext                                     1,044,464                 18,695,906
NASDAQ OMX Group Inc                     539,840                 10,570,067
Moody’s Corp                                            769,534                  17,637,719
Barclays plc                                             1,278,276                    2,711,681

–Airlines–

Continental Airlines – Class B                313,800                 2,764,578
Southwest Airlines Company              3,345,891                21,179,490
Delta Air Lines Inc                                      16,000                      90,080
JetBlue Airways Corp                               745,342                 2,720,498
Airtran Holdings Inc                                470,680                  2,141,594
Alaska Air Group Inc                                 191,600                3,366,412
All Nippon Airways                                      11,000                      42,989
British Airways                                          398,483                    804,201
Air China Ltd – H                                     446,000                     143,871
Japan Airlines Corp                                  176,000                     356,384
Singapore Airlines Ltd                             347,540                  2,286,147
Cathay Pacific Airways                            702,000                      697,471
Qantas Airways Ltd                                  220,300                     267,097
Ryanair Holdings plc – Spons ADR      298,400                6,896,024
Auckland International Airport Ltd         34,621                       33,789
Priceline.Com Inc                                       231,150               18,209,997

.

For more information on the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, government wealth through investment, and this complete conflict of interest of government, please visit the following sites:

http://thecorporationnation.com/

https://realitybloger.wordpress.com/

http://cafr1.com/

http://cafrman.com/

.

Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)

Friday, May 6, 2011

CAFR School Part 2: Minnesota’s State CAFR Explained


Welcome back to CAFR School!

Part 2 will be a more advanced look into the CAFR. In this case, the state CAFR.

This is an explanation of the State of Minnesota Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), for fiscal year ending June 30, 2010. This is the basic set up of most state CAFR’s. Most terms are the same throughout government financial reporting.

The report can be viewed here: http://www.mmb.state.mn.us/doc/acct/2010.pdf

Or, you can download the Minnesota CAFR from the states own website, here: http://www.mmb.state.mn.us/cafr-10

(Most of my comments are in red.) - Please follow along in the Minnesota CAFR. This article will not make much sense and you wont figure out how to read these things for yourself if you don’t follow along!

And now, on with the show…

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(Page 9) – Government-Wide Net Assets as listed (not including many funds and “off-balance sheet” investments and monies, as we will discuss further).

Financial Highlights

The assets of the state exceeded liabilities at June 30, 2010, by $10.9 billion (presented as net assets). Of this amount, a deficit of $2.9 billion was reported as unrestricted net assets.

(Note that this is showing only what the Minnesota government outrageously considers liabilities. But these are inevitably future liabilities. This means they are deducting monies as liabilities for things that have not been spent/paid yet. It is a trick that makes it appear that the government is not wealthy. For perspective… If you have $2,000 in your bank account today, do you write in your checking register (your own personal CAFR) that you have already spent money that you haven’t even written a check for yet, for liabilities and future bills that you might not have to pay for until 6 months to 10 years later? No!!!) 

From the CAFR…

Unrestricted net assets represents the amount available to the state to meet ongoing obligations to citizens and creditors. However, many of the resources have internally imposed designations, such as state statutory language, which limit resource use. These assets are not reported as restricted net assets because the limitations are imposed internally by the state, not externally imposed by sources such as creditors or the constitution. For discussion on the variances from prior year, see the Government-wide Financial Analysis section.

§ The state’s total net assets decreased by $1.2 billion (9.9 percent) during fiscal year 2010. Net assets of governmental activities decreased by $761 million (7.5 percent), while net assets of the business-type activities showed a decrease of $439 million (22.6 percent). For discussion on the variances from prior year, see the Government-wide Financial Analysis section.

(So the State claims that it is in the red here by over 2 billion dollars on its “government-wide {on-balance sheet}” statements. Let’s see how many hidden “off-balance sheet” investment funds we can find…)

Fund Level

§ At the end of the current fiscal year, governmental funds reported a combined ending fund balance of $2.8 billion, a decrease of $774 million compared to the prior year. Included in the ending fund balance is a General Fund unassigned deficit of $1.5 billion. For discussion on the variances from prior year, see the State Funds Financial Analysis section.

(But what about the other funds besides these governmental funds? Let’s see…)

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(Page 7) – Fund and Component Unit Definitions:

The state’s three discretely presented major component units are:

§ Housing Finance Agency

§ Metropolitan Council

§ University of Minnesota

The state’s six nonmajor component units are combined into a single column for reporting in the fund financial statements. These nonmajor component units are:

§ Agricultural and Economic Development Board

§ National Sports Center Foundation

§ Office of Higher Education

§ Public Facilities Authority

§ Rural Finance Authority

§ Workers’ Compensation Assigned Risk Plan

(We will come back to these later…)

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State Fund and Component Unit Financial Statements (definition of a “fund”)

A fund is a grouping of related self-balancing accounts used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific activities or objectives. The state of Minnesota, like other state and local governments, uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal requirements.

Fund financial statements present financial information in a format familiar to experienced users of governmental financial statements and reports. The fund financial statements focus on individual parts of the state, reporting the state’s operations in more detail than in the government-wide statements. Fund financial statements focus on the most significant funds within the state.

(Only experienced financial experts can read these reports… or angry citizens with nothing to lose like me!)

The state’s funds are divided into three categories:

Governmental Funds

Governmental funds record most of the basic services provided by the state and account for essentially the same functions as reported in the governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. Unlike the government-wide financial statements, the fund financial statements focus on how money flows in and out of the funds during a fiscal year and spendable resources available at the end of the fiscal year.

Governmental funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting, which recognizes revenues when they are available and measurable. Expenditures are generally recognized in the accounting period when the fund liability is incurred, if measurable. This approach is known as the flow of current financial resources measurement focus. These statements provide a detailed short-term view of the state’s finances that assists in determining whether there are more or less resources available and whether these financial resources will be adequate to meet the current needs of the state. Governmental funds include the General, special revenue, capital project, Debt Service, and Permanent funds.

The focus of governmental funds is narrower than that of the government-wide financial statements. It is useful to compare the information presented for governmental funds with similar information presented for governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements. By comparing this financial financing decisions.

The basic financial statements include a reconciliation of governmental funds to governmental activities.

These reconciliations follow the governmental funds balance sheet and the governmental funds statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances.

The state maintained 29 individual governmental funds. However, six of these funds were either moved to the General Fund or combined into another fund and one fund was split and a portion of the activity was moved to the General Fund as a result of implementing Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 54, “Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions.”

(So these funds can used and merged in any way that these government crooks see fit.)

Information is presented separately in the governmental funds balance sheet and in the governmental funds statement of revenues, expenditures, and changes in fund balances for the General and Federal funds, which are reported as major funds. Information from the remaining funds is combined into a single, aggregated column. Individual fund data for each of these nonmajor governmental funds is provided in the form of combining statements included in this report.

(So they don’t report a major portion of the funds, investments, and wealth in the financial statements published to the taxpayers.)

The state adopts a biennial budget with annual appropriations for the majority of the activity reported in the General Fund. A budgetary comparison statement has been provided for the General Fund activity with appropriations included in the biennial budget to demonstrate compliance with this budget.

Proprietary Funds

When the state charges customers for the services it provides, whether to outside customers or to other agencies within the state, these services are generally reported in proprietary funds. Proprietary funds (enterprise and internal service) utilize accrual accounting which is the same method used by private sector businesses. Proprietary fund financial statements provide the same type of information as the government-wide financial statements, only in more detail.

Enterprise funds, a type of proprietary fund, are used to report activities that provide goods and services to outside (non-government) customers, including the general public. Internal service funds are an accounting device used to accumulate and allocate costs internally for goods and services provided by one program of the state to another. Because the activities reported by internal service funds predominantly benefit governmental functions rather than business-type functions, the internal service funds have been included within governmental activities in the government-wide financial statements.

(Enterprise funds are businesses run by the government, and citizens (the general public) are considered nothing more than outside customers!)

(Also, note that it tells us here that only certain funds, in this case the “internal service funds” are reported to the taxpayers; the general public. Make no mistake, government is a for-profit business and the people are just the customers… or chattel!) 

The state maintains 17 individual proprietary funds. The State Colleges and Universities and Unemployment Insurance funds, both of which are considered major funds, are presented separately in the proprietary funds statement of net assets and in the proprietary funds statement of revenues, expenses, and changes in net assets. Information from the 8 nonmajor enterprise funds and the 7 internal service funds are combined into two separate aggregated columns. Individual fund data for each of these nonmajor proprietary funds is provided in the form of combining statements presented in this report.

Fiduciary Funds

Fiduciary funds are used to report activities when the state acts as a trustee or fiduciary to hold resources for the benefit of parties outside the state. The accrual basis of accounting is used for fiduciary funds and is similar to the accounting used for proprietary funds. The government-wide statements exclude fiduciary fund activities and balances because these assets are restricted in purpose and cannot be used by the state to finance its operations. The state must assure that the assets reported in fiduciary funds are used for their intended purposes.

The state maintains 21 individual fiduciary funds. The state’s fiduciary funds are the pension trust funds, the investment trust funds (which account for the transactions, assets, liabilities, and fund equity of the external investment pools), and the Agency Fund (which accounts for the assets held for distribution by the state as an agent for other governmental units, other organizations, or individuals). Individual fund detail is included in the combining financial statements included in this report.

Component Units

Component units are legally separate organizations for which the state is financially accountable. The government-wide financial statements present information for the component units in a single column on the statement of net assets. Also, some information on the statement of changes in net assets is aggregated for component units. The component units’ statements of net assets and statement of changes in net assets provide detail for each major component unit and aggregate the detail for nonmajor component units. Individual nonmajor component unit detail can be found in the combining financial statements included in this report.

(Remember… there is no real law that states these funds cannot be used for anything at all, and they can be transferred or even closed at any time, and the money transferred to other funds or to who knows where!)

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(Page 66) - Investments

The State Board of Investment (SBI) manages the majority of the state‟s investments. All investments undertaken by SBI are governed by the standards codified in Minnesota Statutes, Chapters 11A and 356A. Minnesota Statutes, Section 11A.24, broadly restricts investments of the primary government to obligations and stocks of United States and Canadian governments, their agencies and registered corporations, other international securities, short-term obligations of specified high quality, restricted participation as a limited partner in venture capital, real estate, or resource equity investments, and restricted participation in registered mutual funds.

Funds not invested by SBI are primarily Minnesota State Colleges and Universities‟ funds…

SBI is authorized to establish, and has established, combined investment funds used by participating public retirement and non-retirement funds. Retirement and non-retirement funds may not be commingled. Each investment fund has its own characteristics, including investment objective and risk characteristics. Within statutory requirements and based on detailed analysis of each fund, SBI has established investment guidelines and benchmarks for all funds under its management. These investment guidelines and benchmarks are tailored to the particular needs of each fund and specify investment objectives, risk tolerance, asset allocation, investment management structure, and specific performance standards.

(Isn’t it reassuring to know that the SBI is acting within the laws that it sets for itself? Somehow that just makes this theft seem like a gift from God, doesn’t it? I mean, really, as long as the federal and state laws say that the government can steel trillions and trillions of dollars from the taxpayers without any real public disclosure and then hide that money in these funds, all seems right with the world…)

(Note: This is sarcasm. God wouldn’t like this very much, me thinks.)

————————————————————–

(Page 66)Synthetic Guaranteed Investment Contract (SGIC): 

State Board of Investment (SBI) maintains a fully benefit-responsive SGIC for the Supplemental Investment Pool – Fixed Interest Account of the Pension Trust and Investment Trust Funds portfolio. The investment objective of the Fixed Interest Account is to protect investors in defined contribution and deferred compensation plans from loss of their original investment and to provide a competitive interest rate. On June 30, 2010, the SGIC had a portfolio of well diversified high quality investment grade fixed income securities with a fair value of $747,887,000 that is $37,692,000 in excess of the value protected by the wrap contract. The Fixed Income Account also includes a liquid investment pool and a guaranteed investment contract with fair values of $214,955,000 and $326,545,000, respectively.  (Total = $1,289,387,000)

(Note: The author (me) is not sure if this is above and beyond what the state has reported in its Pension Fund Totals, so we won’t include this in our final total of this CAFR wealth. We’ll give it an honorable mention though, for sure! Wouldn’t want to double-count…)

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(Page 80 – 82) - Note 5 – Interfund Transactions 

Primary Government

During normal operations, the state processes routine transactions between funds, including loans, expenditures, and transfers of resources for administrative and program services, debt service, and compliance with legal mandates. In the fund financial statements, these transactions are generally recorded as transfers in/transfers out and interfund receivables/payables. Transfers generally represent legally authorized transfers between funds authorized to receive revenue and funds authorized to make expenditures, and do not represent reimbursement of expenditures.

(So monies/investments are allowed to be moved around between funds. They say again here that the -law- says it’s OK to do this. So the question we should be asking our supposedly representative government is… Why don’t you “authorize” or change the legalities (not laws) so that this investment wealth can be used for the benefit of “We, the People” instead of you greedy bankers, attorneys, and politicians? I think that’s a fair question…)

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————————————————————–

(Now we will list these funds out, and show where the real money is invested…)

(Note: All figures listed in this CAFR are “in thousands”, meaning I have added 3 zeros {,000} to all totals.)

————————————————————–

(Page 31)“Major Governmental Funds” descriptions:

–General Fund - the fund accounts for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in another fund.

–Federal Fund - The fund receives and disburses federal government grants and reimbursements. The fund is administered in accordance with grant agreements between the state and federal agencies.

(page 32) - Total for the General fund as listed on the “GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS BALANCE SHEET” is $3,916,496,000 as of June 30,2010.

.

(Note: Remember the Statement of Net Assets from above? It stated that, “Included in the ending fund balance is a General Fund unassigned deficit of $1.5 billion”. And yet here we see the actual balance in the fund is over $3.9 billion!!!)

(The Statement of Net Assets also claimed that, “At the end of the current fiscal year, governmental funds reported a combining ending fund balance of $2.8 billion, a decrease of $744 million compared to the prior year”. Obviously, this is a lie, as the balance of just the General Fund is again 3.9 billion!!!)

.

(page 32) - Total for the Federal fund as listed on the “GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS BALANCE SHEET” is $1,579,194,000 as of June 30,2010.

.

Note that while “Nonmajor Funds” are listed here too, we will be covering those funds individually in a moment…

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(Page 37) - “Major Proprietary Funds” descriptions:

State Colleges and Universities Fund - The fund accounts for the activities of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU). MnSCU is a system of public state universities and two-year colleges and is the largest system of higher education in the state. While the primary activity of MnSCU is to provide educational services, the fund also includes scholarships, student loans, bookstores, student living activities, research, and long-term debt.

Unemployment Insurance Fund - The fund receives unemployment taxes collected from employers and pays unemployment benefits to eligible individuals.

(Page 39) - Total for the State Colleges and Universities Fund as listed on the “STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS” is $1,723,766,000 as of June 30,2010.

(Page 39) - Total for the Unemployment Insurance Fund as listed on the “STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS” is at a negative – $266,135,000 as of June 30,2010.

.

Note that while “Nonmajor Enterprise Funds” and “Internal Service Funds” are listed here too, we will be covering those funds individually in a moment…

————————————————————–

(Page 47)“Major Component Unit Funds” descriptions:

Housing Finance Agency - The agency provides money for loans and technical assistance for construction and rehabilitation of housing for families of low and moderate incomes.

Metropolitan Council - The council is responsible for coordinating the planning and development of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. The council also operates the metropolitan regional sewage treatment and disposal systems and the public transit system. The Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission, a component unit of the council, operates the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome sports facility. 

University of Minnesota - The multi-campus university provides undergraduate and graduate degrees, advanced research opportunities, and an extension service. The university includes several nonprofit foundations that provide resources which benefit the university.

(Note that these are the funds held by these government for-profit businesses (component units) and are NOT referring to the actual buildings, equipment, or other real assets associated with them. These are stating totals for cash and liquid investments.)

(Page 48) - Total for the Housing Finance Agency Fund as listed on the “STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” is $1,723,766,000 as of June 30,2010.

(Page 48) - Total for the Metropolitan Council Fund as listed on the “STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” is $1,872,301,000 as of June 30,2010.

(Page 48) - Total for the University of Minnesota Fund as listed on the “STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” is $4,785,350,000 as of June 30,2010.

.

Note that while “Nonmajor Component Unit Funds”  are listed here too, we will be covering those funds individually in a moment…

————————————————————–

(Page 125 – 127) - Risk Management Fund – Read this for an explanation of Self-Insurance. This is a fund built to pay for any lawsuits or torts brought against the state or its component units. This is the hoarding and investing of taxpayer dollars. So if you sue the state, you will be receiving taxpayer money or the return on this money from investments in this fund. (Total for this fund presented later as a Nonmajor Enterprise Fund.)

————————————————————–

 (Page 131)Budgetary Basis vs. GAAP explanation:

Actual revenues, transfers-in, expenditures, encumbrances, and transfers-out on the budgetary basis do not equal those on the GAAP basis in the Governmental Funds Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances for the General Fund. This inequality results primarily from the differences in the recognition of accruals, reimbursements, deferred revenue, intrafund transactions, and loan classifications, and from the budgetary basis of accounting for encumbrances. On the budgetary basis, encumbrances are recognized as expenditures in the year encumbered. The modified accrual basis of accounting recognizes expenditures when the goods or services are received, regardless of the year funds are encumbered. A reconciliation of the fund balances under the two basis of accounting for the General Fund is provided in the following table.

(Translation: Some government money and investments are not reported on the taxpayer budget, nor in the Statement of Net Assets we listed above on page 9. There are two different ways of financial reporting, one for the dumbed down masses who can barely balance their checkbook, and one for the elite power brokers in government and the corporate world.)

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(Page 142) Actuarial Measures of Pension Funding Progress

The state of Minnesota is the employer for five defined benefit single employer plans that are administered by Minnesota State Retirement System (MSRS). MSRS prepares and publishes its own stand-alone comprehensive annual financial report (see Note 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting and Reporting Policies for the address).

(Note: When we look at the separate Pension Fund CAFR we see that the “employer” defined here as the State of Minnesota contributes/matches employee contributions to the pension fund system. So the state puts billions of taxpayer money (the state is supported by taxpayer money) into the pension fund for investment with no benefit for the taxpayers.)

The Elective State Officers Fund (ESOF) is excluded from the single employer plan disclosures since this plan is closed to new entrants and any former active employees have retired, terminated, or elected coverage under another plan.

Required supplementary information of funding progress is provided for the following plans:

§ Correctional Employees Retirement Fund (CERF)

§ Judicial Retirement Fund (JRF)

§ Legislative Retirement Fund LRF)

§ State Patrol Retirement Fund (SPRF)

 

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(Page 147 – 151) - Combining and Individual Fund Statements – Nonmajor Funds

Nonmajor Special Revenue, Debt Service, Permanent and Capital Projects Funds

(Page 151 – Chart) - COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES

(Note that these are reported “in thousands”, meaning we must add three zero’s {,ooo} to the end of each figure. These are the supposed totals for all the funds included in these categories.)

SPECIAL REVENUE       

-> $1,975,916,000

DEBT SERVICE

-> $764,447,000

PERMANENT SCHOOL

-> $694,452,000

CAPITAL PROJECTS

-> $205,002,000

TOTAL

-> $3,639,817,000

.

(Note that {in thousands} the “Net Change in Fund Balances” column (fourth row from bottom of graph) shows profits/increases of  – $122,913,000 – $22,378,000 – $64,229,000 – and $108,739,000 – with the total profit for these funds listed at $318,259,000. This is how much money was added to these funds in fiscal year 2010 over fiscal year 2009)

————————————————————–

(Page 152 – 153)gives a description of each “Special Revenue Fund”

Note the difference between the totals of the chart on (page 154 – 157)NONMAJOR SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS COMBINING BALANCE SHEET”…

and the chart on (page 158 – 161)COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES”

On the “COMBINING BALANCE SHEET” we can see that total fund balances are actually in the amount of $2,719,861,000… a difference of over $700,000,000 as compared to what is reported on the “COMBINING STATEMENT” chart.

(Always go with the higher figure, as again they are attaching future liabilities to the money they have today.)

————————————————————–

(Page 169)gives a description of each “Capital Project Fund”

“COMBINING BALANCE SHEET” totals – $253,749,000

“COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES” totals – $205,002,000

So we can add almost $50 million to the total listed, taking the highest figure without “future obligations”. 

(This is the actual holdings at the time of this report.)

 ————————————————————–

(Page 169)gives a description of each “Nonmajor Enterprise Fund”

(Note that this is a new set of funds, not listed above, and including…)

Behavioral Services Fund

Enterprise Activities Fund

Giants Ridge Fund

Minnesota Correctional Industries Fund

911 Services Fund

Public Employees Insurance Fund

State Lottery Fund

State Operated Community Services Fund

 .

(Page 174 – 175) The “COMBINING STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” {in thousands} chart shows $45,315,000 in these funds under the Totals column. So we can add that to our hidden wealth totals…

(Page 181)gives a description of each Nonmajor Internal Service Fund, which includes the “Risk Management Fund” that we covered above as a self-insurance fund.

(Page 182 – 183) - The “COMBINING STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” {in thousands} chart shows $320,436,000 in total fund balances, which in this case is the same as the COMBINING STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS chart.

————————————————————–

PENSION TRUST FUNDS!!! – (Remember, Pension Funds are where the government diverts billions (trillions nationally) of taxpayer money, not just employee money.)

(Page 188 – 189) - Minnesota State Retirement System includes… 

–Correctional Employees Retirement Fund

–Elective State Officers Fund

–Hennepin County Supplemental Retirement Fund

–Judicial Retirement Fund

–Legislative Retirement Fund

–Postretirement Health Care Benefits Fund

–State Deferred Compensation Fund

–State Employees Retirement Fund

–State Patrol Retirement Fund 

–Unclassified Employees Retirement Fund 

 .

The Public Employees Retirement Association includes…

–Defined Contribution Fund 

–Minneapolis Employees Retirement Fund 

–Police and Fire Fund 

–Public Employees Correctional Fund

–Public Employees Retirement Fund

–Volunteer Firefighter Retirement Fund

 .

The Teachers Retirement Association includes…

–Teachers Retirement Fund

.

The State Colleges and Universities includes…

–Colleges and Universities Retirement Fund

 .

(Again, these funds where not included above.)

(Page 190 – 193) COMBINING STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS shows totals for these pension funds listed at $45,746,335,000.

(Page 197) This represents an increase (profit) in the fund balances over 2009 of at least $4,336,688,000.

(Yes, yes… these are the retirement funds and they are designated for the employees. We can’t touch those, right? Again, this fund represents billions and billions of dollars of taxpayer money, and the investment return on these fund’s collective investments. This total shown represents the money and investments in the fund AFTER all liabilities to the employees are paid, and after future liabilities are considered. So you tell me whose money this really is… and before you answer that, consider the fact that at any time the President of the United States can create an Executive Order that states that all collective fund balances in the government pension funds are now the property of the Federal Government. If we don’t reclaim this through strict regulation and anti-federal shields in the name of the people and soon, it will be gone with the stroke of a pen. And all of these state employees who are so defensive of their pension funds now will have nothing left to defend. It will all be gone!)

————————————————————–

(Page 199) -INVESTMENT TRUST FUNDS”

Supplemental Retirement Fund - The fund provides an investment vehicle for the assets of various public retirement plans and funds.

Investment Trust Fund - The fund provides an investment vehicle for external funds authorized to be invested by the state.

(Page 201) “STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN PLAN NET ASSETS” shows totals for these funds at $482,714,000. 

This is an increase of $30,835,000 over fiscal year 2009, as listed under “Net Increase”.

 ————————————————————–

(Page 203)Agency Funds” description

Agency Fund - This fund accounts for resources held in a custodial capacity for other governmental units, private organizations, or individuals.

Totals listed at $124,220,000

————————————————————–

(Page 205)“Nonmajor Component Unit Funds” descriptions…

(Note that this is not the value of the buildings, equipment, and other hard assets involved with these component units {state-run businesses}, these are the funds that each unit has in investment holdings in (liquid) assets and cash.)

Agricultural and Economic Development Board 

National Sports Center Foundation 

Office of Higher Education

Public Facilities Authority

Rural Finance Authority

Workers’ Compensation Assigned Risk Plan

.

(Page 206 – 207) The “COMBINING STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS” states that the totals for these funds are at $1,488,337,000

(Page 209) “Change in Net Assets” show and increase to these funds of $97,359,000 over fiscal year 2009.

————————————————————–

Last but not least, we have…

(Page 83) – Note 6 – Capital Assets:

Primary Government

The following table shows capital asset activity for the primary government:

(Page 83) - See Chart here entitled“Primary Government Capital Asset Activity Government-wide Governmental Activities”

This is the value stated after depriciation for the following “capital assets”, which represents the physical equity in the following:

Land - Buildings, Structures, Improvements - Construction in Progress - Development in Progress - Infrastructure - Easements - Art and Historical Treasures

Total value listed here for these Capital Assets are $11,982,234,000

(Note: that these are not necessarily salable or liquidate-able assets, and so we will not include them in our total below, which will only represent fund, investment, and cash on hand as of June 30, 2010.)

————————————————————–

END OF REPORT

————————————————————–

So let’s total up what we have found in the Minnesota CAFR, and compare that total to what the state is reporting to its taxpaying citizens on the taxpayer budget report…

General fund                                                    $3,916,496,000 

Federal fund                                                     $1,579,194,000 

State Colleges and Universities Fund     $1,723,766,000

Unemployment Insurance Fund             (- $266,135,000)

Housing Finance Agency Fund                 $1,723,766,000 

Metropolitan Council Fund                       $1,872,301,000 

University of Minnesota Fund                 $4,785,350,000

Special Revenue Funds                               $2,719,861,000

Capital Projects Funds                                   $253,749,000

Enterprise Funds                                             $320,436,000

Pension Trust Funds                                 $45,746,335,000

Investment Trust Funds                                 $482,714,000

Agency Funds                                                     $124,220,000

Nonmajor Component Unit Funds        $1,488,337,000

———————————————————————————

TOTAL FUND BALANCES…                   $66,470,390,000

———————————————————————————

.

Again, this is a look at the fund balances for the state, and should not be construed as a total look at what this CAFR has to offer in the form of hidden wealth and investments for Minnesota. It would take a guru of an accountant to figure all of this out…

But I think that we have proven without a doubt that the Minnesota state government is guilty of misrepresentation of its wealth to the taxpaying public when it releases its tax-payer budget every year, and when it states in its “government-wide statement of Net Assets” that it only has $10,865,096,000 in “Total Net Assets” including Capital Assets (chart on page 10).

This financial statement (CAFR) structure will look very similar on most state CAFR’s. The order may different, but the terms and fund group types will be virtually identical. You may have to look for this information, but a bit of logic and reason should get you through. The most difficult thing to succeed at is to push aside all of the redundant and pointless information and graphs in lieu of the real hidden gold.

For more information on the corporate government CAFR system, please visit these sites:

http://thecorporationnation.com/

http://cafr1.com/

http://cafrman.com/

http://taxretirement.com/

.

Happy treasure hunting to you and yours…

.

–Clint Richardson (realitybloger.wordpress.com)

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

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